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TU Berlin

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Introduction "Daylighting and Indoor Lighting"

"Daylighting and Indoor Lighting" research at the Chair of Lighting Technology, led by Dr. Martine Knoop, aims

  • to promote and improve daylight design, as well as
  • to develop new adaptive electric lighting solutions,
  • to enhance user well-being and performance in interiors, especially for the 'daylight deprived' (e.g. inhabitants of dense urban settings, elderly with dementia and hospital patients).

Video Research topics "Daylight and Indoor Lighting at TU Berlin" (in German)
 

Characterisation of Daylighting Conditions

At present, daylight planning often considers a minimum daylight coefficient, a constant ratio, or the course of the daylight coefficient on a horizontal plane in the room. This ratio does not reflect the dynamics or absolute lighting levels, nor does it consider spatial light distribution. The correlated colour temperature (CCT) of daylight is most of the time set to 6500 K, even though research has shown that the spectral power distribution of specific regions of the sky can vary largely. To evaluate the impact of daylight on human beings and support healthy lighting design, a proper and detailed description of daylight provision in the room and at the eye is required.

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For this purpose, various measurements of daylight are carried out at the daylight measuring site of the TU Berlin, including spatially resolved spectral power distribution measurements with a spectral sky scanner. 

Exemplary data sets are available on request.

The measurements of the spectral sky scanner are also used to develop measuring equipment to characterise daylight in other locations, and to establish spectral sky models to be used in lighting design and research.

Live stream of the daylight measuring site (Gast / licht) 

Representation of measurements of the spectral sky scanner: CCT distribution for an overcast (l) and clear (r) sky condition 

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Related Research

Bachelor & Master theses to this topic can be found here.

Selected Publications

  • Knoop M., Diakite A., Rudawski F. 2015. Methodology to create spectral sky models to enable the inclusion of colorimetric characteristics of daylight in research and design. In: Proceedings of the 28th session of the CIE, June 28 - July 3 2015, Manchester, United Kingdom 
  • Knoop M., Weber N., Diakite A. 2019. Approach to analyse seasonal and geographical variations in daylight illuminants. In: Proceedings of the 29th session of the CIE, June 17 - 19 2019, Washington, US

Characterisation of Lighting Conditions for NIF Studies

Lighting conditions in studies investigating non-image forming effects are often described with light level at the eye and correlated color temperature only, both being integral measurements that are not appropriate to give information about the spatial distribution of light and its spectrum. The Chair of Lighting Technology studies approaches for spatially and spectrally resolved measurements to properly quantify lighting conditions in research on non-image-forming effects. 

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Directograms for lighting conditions at the observer’s eye level: Fish eye image of lighting solution in viewing direction (l); representation in viewing direction (m); representation seen from the side, perpendicular to the viewing direction (r)

Related Research

Bachelor & Master theses to this topic can be found here.

Selected Publications

  • Knoop, M., Diakite, A.K., Liedtke, C., Broszio, K., Niedling, M. 2017 Characterisation of daylight's spatial and spectral distribution to assess its impact on human beings. In: CIE x044:2017 Proceedings of the CIE 2017 Midterm Meeting, October 20 - 28 2017, JeJu Island, Republic of Korea, p 318 – 328
  • Knoop, M., Broszio, K., Diakite, A., Liedtke, C., Niedling, M., Rothert, I., ... & Weber, N. (2019). Methods to describe and measure lighting conditions in experiments on non-image-forming aspects. Leukos15(2-3), 163-179.

Daylight Supplement and Simulation for the Daylight Deprived

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With advancing urbanisation a lack of daylight becomes inevitable. While the number of stress-related illnesses is increasing, the access to daylight and nature is becoming more and more restricted. However, daylight in particular, as a clock generator of the circadian rhythm, could contribute to improved sleep quality and the reduction of stress. In spaces with low daylight provision, adaptive and anticipative electric lighting solutions can supplement the daylight,  considering all relevant characteristics for human well-being and health. For all others affected, daylight simulations in virtual reality, which are independent of location, could be a substitution. 

Related Research

  • Daylight Simulation in Virtual Reality - Marina Leontopoulos & Silke A. Müller
  • Enhanced Human Centric Lighting - Individual automated lighting condition by means of a wearable light dosimeter - Frederic Rudaswski

Bachelor & Master theses to this topic can be found here.

Selected Publications

  • Knoop, M., Stefani, O., Bueno, B., Matusiak, B., Hobday, R., Wirz-Justice, A., ... & Norton, B. (2020). Daylight: What makes the difference?. Lighting Research & Technology52(3), 423-442. DOI: 10.1177/1477153519869758
  • F. Rudawski, M. Knoop. 2019. Enhanced Human Centric Lighting - Individual automated lighting condition by means of a wearable light dosimeter. In: Tagungsband Lux junior 2019, 14. Internationales Forum für den lichttechnischen Nachwuchs, 06. – 08. September 2019, Dörnfeld/Ilm, Hrsg. C. Vandahl und C. Schierz, DOI: 10.22032/dbt.39587 

Guidelines and Tools

The main goal of this research is the development of novel data-driven spectral sky models to improve the characterization of daylight. These spectral sky models enable the integration of daylight in the design of urban structures that support people’s well-being. The models will be used to study the impact of building orientation, prevailing daylighting conditions and urban obstruction proprieties in assessment of spectral characteristics of daylight on façades. The resulting spectral characteristics of daylight on façades will be represented in so-called spectral daylight potential diagrams (SDPD), as a design aid for a broader audience.

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Daylight potential diagrams showing (a) a CCT of 6500 K currently considered in daylighting design; (b) a schematic representation of CCT for an overcast sky; (c) a schematic representation of CCT for a clear sky with different sun positions; (d) a schematic representation of CCT for a clear sky condition with one sun position and different obstruction levels

Related Research

Bachelor & Master theses to this topic can be found here.

Selected Publications

  • Diakite, A., Knoop, M., Völker, S. 2017. Development and Application of Spectral Sky Models in Urban Planning, Poster at: 7th Velux Daylight Symposium, Berlin, Germany. 

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